In the News

Virtual Events for Bike Month

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We hope you will get out in the month of May to ride your bike on all the trails and greenways in Greenboro while keeping a safe social distance. The City of Greensboro and BIG are offering several events during bike month; see below. Cory Phillips, Executive Director of the Roberts Center at Crumley Roberts shared a short video with us on how to stay safe on the roads and properly fit your bike helmet.  Click here to view.    

Thomas Sayre proposal for West Woods on Phase 4

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Artist Thomas Sayre from Raleigh presented his proposal at an on-line Public Meeting on May 5 for the West Woods Project to be installed on Phase 4 along the rail-line on the Downtown Greenway.  Installation anticipated in early 2021.  Read the story in the News & Record by reported Dawn Kane. Did you miss the on-line Public Meeting on May 5?  You can watch it here and view his proposal here.  If you have any comments or suggestions about the plans, please email Laura Lorenz at llorenz@actiongreensboro.org.  

Tips on keeping safe as you are out on trails and greenways

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We hope this post fines you well and healthy!  Hope you are getting outside on Greensboro's great trails and greenways and enjoying this spring weather while social distancing!  Here are some tips for staying safe during the COVID-19 outbreak: Follow CDC’s guidance on personal hygiene prior to heading to trails — wash hands, carry hand sanitizer, do not use trails if you have symptoms, cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, etc. Do not visit trails/parks if you have symptoms of COVID-19 or have been recently exposed to the virus and do not have symptoms (within 14 days). Observe at all times CDC’s minimum recommended social distancing of six feet from other people. Practice it and know what it looks like. Keep it as you walk, bike or hike. Use parks/trails near your home instead of traveling and avoided parks that are crowded and the six feet rule cannot apply. Warn other trail users of your presence and as you pass to allow proper distance and step off trails to allow others to pass, keeping minimum recommended distances at all times. Signal your presence with your voice, bell or horn. Note that trail and park users may find public restrooms closed — be prepared before you leave and time outings so that you are not dependent on public restrooms. Bring water or drinks — public drinking fountains may be disabled and should not be used, even if operable. The CDC has other recommendations for using parks and recreational facilities here. Click here to find trails and parks near your home.  And find out here which sections of the Downtown Greenway are open and closest to your home.

Artist Thomas Sayre has been selected to create West Woods Project

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Artist Thomas Sayre has been selected to create the West Woods Project on Phase 4 along the railtrail on the Downtown Greenway.  Thomas is a Raleigh-based artist and architect and has constructed works of art all over the world. To create his art, he uses earth and soil from the ground where his sculptures will eventually stand to form earth casts. On-line public meeting will be planned for May to give the public the opportunity to view his proposal for the West Woods Project and to provide feedback.  Click here to watch a segment from UNC-TV on the process that Thomas uses to create his art.

Mason Bee Houses installed on Downtown Greenway as part of Eagle Scout Project

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Click here for plans to make your own Mason Bee House. Click here to learn more about all pollinators in an article in Wildlife in North Carolina Magazine. Hi, my name is Reid Lorenz. I am a Senior at Grimsley High School and an approaching Eagle Scout in Boy Scout Troop 101. You may have noticed new additions to two of the cornerstones on the Downtown Greenway, at the Edible Orchard at Meeting Place and Woven Works Park in the Bird, Bee, and Butterfly Pollinator Garden that surrounds Muddy Creek stream. These new additions are raised mason bee houses, small houses made of cedar wood and stuffed with bamboo rods that help protect and save the declining mason bee population. Recently, bees are in danger from extinction, due to parasites, pesticides, and colony collapse disorder. But when most people hear about bees becoming extinct, they automatically think of honeybees because they are more well-known and affect us more prominently as they are the main pollinators that help our food grow and end up in our homes. But mason bees are just as important. It is thought that one mason bee can do the work of 100 honeybees. Therefore, the main goal of these houses is to help these bees in their pollinating process and give them a nice home to thrive in. In addition to designing, fabricating and installing the houses, I will also plant some pollinator plants around the bases of the three houses at Meeting Place in spring 2020. According to Charlie Headington, local permaculture gardener and member of the Permaculture Guild, mason bees prefer blue, purple, and yellow flowers, so planting purple hyacinth, blue asters, or yellow black-eyed susans are the best options. Back to the houses themselves, the reason for the bamboo inside the houses, is for each bee to have their own nest. They are known as solitary bees, because they neither live in colonies nor have a single queen. Rather, each female mason bee lays four or five eggs in small, natural holes or cavities, like the bamboo rods, each egg separated by mud. You may wonder why the houses are facing the direction that they are—mason bees are ectothermic which means that they can’t regulate their body temperature so their houses need to face a south/southeast direction so they can stay warm with the sun in the winter months. I want to thank Dabney Sanders, Downtown Greenway Project Manager, for letting me put these houses on the Downtown Greenway and can’t wait for the bees to start to cultivate the houses in the spring. Reid Lorenz, BSA Troop 101