Category: The Green in Greenway

Mason Bee Houses installed on Downtown Greenway as part of Eagle Scout Project

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Click here for plans to make your own Mason Bee House. Click here to learn more about all pollinators in an article in Wildlife in North Carolina Magazine. Hi, my name is Reid Lorenz. I am a Senior at Grimsley High School and an approaching Eagle Scout in Boy Scout Troop 101. You may have noticed new additions to two of the cornerstones on the Downtown Greenway, at the Edible Orchard at Meeting Place and Woven Works Park in the Bird, Bee, and Butterfly Pollinator Garden that surrounds Muddy Creek stream. These new additions are raised mason bee houses, small houses made of cedar wood and stuffed with bamboo rods that help protect and save the declining mason bee population. Recently, bees are in danger from extinction, due to parasites, pesticides, and colony collapse disorder. But when most people hear about bees becoming extinct, they automatically think of honeybees because they are more well-known and affect us more prominently as they are the main pollinators that help our food grow and end up in our homes. But mason bees are just as important. It is thought that one mason bee can do the work of 100 honeybees. Therefore, the main goal of these houses is to help these bees in their pollinating process and give them a nice home to thrive in. In addition to designing, fabricating and installing the houses, I will also plant some pollinator plants around the bases of the three houses at Meeting Place in spring 2020. According to Charlie Headington, local permaculture gardener and member of the Permaculture Guild, mason bees prefer blue, purple, and yellow flowers, so planting purple hyacinth, blue asters, or yellow black-eyed susans are the best options. Back to the houses themselves, the reason for the bamboo inside the houses, is for each bee to have their own nest. They are known as solitary bees, because they neither live in colonies nor have a single queen. Rather, each female mason bee lays four or five eggs in small, natural holes or cavities, like the bamboo rods, each egg separated by mud. You may wonder why the houses are facing the direction that they are—mason bees are ectothermic which means that they can’t regulate their body temperature so their houses need to face a south/southeast direction so they can stay warm with the sun in the winter months. I want to thank Dabney Sanders, Downtown Greenway Project Manager, for letting me put these houses on the Downtown Greenway and can’t wait for the bees to start to cultivate the houses in the spring. Reid Lorenz, BSA Troop 101

Join us for a Special One-Time Showing of the Pollinator Movie

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We need 45 people to sign up for this special one-time viewing!  If you have every wondered how you can make a difference to help our pollinators– here is a great opportunity! Click here to reserve your ticket. There is a fee for each ticket.  If we do not reach the minimum number of tickets reserved by February 28, your credit card will not be charged.  Local bee experts from UNCG’s Plant & Pollinator Center will be on hand to answer questions.  Also, Boy Scout Reid Lorenz will have plans for making your own Mason Bee House and samples to share like those he installed on the Downtown Greenway this fall.

A ‘Green’ Dream: Imagining Greensboro in 2030

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Corey Hillman shares ideas for making Greensboro a walkable city. What can you do to help make this dream into a reality? Click here to his read article. Corey Hillman is a graduate of Baylor University holding a Doctorate in Physical Therapy. He is a Greensboro native and a member of the Communications Committee for the Downtown Greenway. You can follow him at @GboroPhysio.

2018 FREE Fitness Classes on the Downtown Greenway are here! Get outside!

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2018 FREE Fitness Class Schedule on the Downtown Greenway Classes this year will begin in May and will be held every Tuesday from 6-7pm through October (except for July because it is SO hot!) on the Downtown Greenway located at 475 Spring Garden Street.  The Morehead Trail parking lot will be blocked off to cars during the class.  Parking is available on the street or at 408 Blandwood Street and 500 Spring Garden Street. We are excited to offer free classes for the 4th season in partnership with the Bryan YMCA. We have some regular instructors from past seasons and welcome our new instructors. Click here for the classes/instructors. Look out for some new features this year-- a frequent attendee punch card and we will be participating in the DGI Summer Passport program-- the more you come the more chances you have of getting free stuff!

SPOTLIGHT on Volunteers: Greensboro Permaculture Guild

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Special thanks to the Greensboro Permaculture Guild for their work on the Downtown Greenway on the section in front of Deep Roots Market on Eugene.  They have transferred fruit trees and perennials from the community garden at Holy Trinity to the area in front of Deep Roots to make way for new building construction at Holy Trinity. Thanks to Randall Hayes, Charlie Headington, Charlotte LeHecka, Alyssa McKim, David Mudd, Rob Pritchard, Elaine Shields, and Justin Vettel for coming out on a foggy morning to get their hands in the dirt! Stop by Deep Roots for lunch and enjoy the Permaculture Guild's hard work in beautifying the area and the Downtown Greenway. Deep Roots will be helping to maintain and water this section-- thank you!

LimeBikes bikeshare program coming to Greensboro!

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LimeBike will kick-off the city-wide expansion of the bike share program at First Friday on Friday, August 4th at 5:30 pm.  Come out on Friday to the block of 513 South Elm Street to take a test drive and find out more about the program.   Earlier this month, City Council approved a two-year agreement that allows LimeBike to offer bicycles for a fee anywhere in the city limits. People can use the LimeBike app to locate and rent a bicycle for $1 per half hour. LimeBike is already offered on the UNCG campus for $0.50 per half hour for students, faculty and staff. LimeBike plans to deliver 800 more three-speed bikes to Greensboro to be used at UNCG, NC A&T and in downtown Greensboro in early August. Downtown Greensboro Inc. and Action Greensboro officials are working with center city merchants to identify locations where the bikes can be parked. After the official bike share celebration stay for First Friday on the Block from 6-9pm on S. Elm St between MLK Jr. Drive & Lewis Street. Talk to representatives from LimeBike, listen to great music, participate in trivia, and grab some food. Click here for the event flyer. For more information about LimeBike, visit the company's website.

Huge Shout-out to Triad Chapter of NC Native Plant Society

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Members of the Triad Chapter of the NC Native Plant Society came out on March 25 to get the Bird, Bee, Butterfly Garden at Woven Works Park ready for spring by pulling weeds.  They have another work day set for Saturday, April 15. Special thanks to these volunteers: John Bartlett, Laurette Guay, Diane Laslie, Elizabeth Link, Deborah Staves, Lynda Waldrop, and Judy West. If you are interested in volunteering, please email Dabney Sanders at dsanders@actiongreensboro.org.

It’s Not Easy Being Green ‘People’s Choice’ Award announced

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Thanks to all who participated in the It's Not Easy Being Green holiday photo contest to support businesses affected by the construction of the Downtown Greenway on North Eugene Street.  A winner on social media was picked each week and received a $50 gift card from one of the four businesses: Crafted the Art of Street Food, Joymongers Brewing Company, Preyer Brewing Company & Deep Roots Market.          And the 'People's Choice' Award for the photo with the most 'likes' on social media is...... Congratulations to the winner of the 'People's Choice ' Award with a $25 gift card from each of the businesses.  Thanks to everyone who participated in the contest and came out to support local this holiday season!  Keep shopping local at all of our great restaurants and businesses downtown.